California Trout Awarded $4.9 Million for Habitat Restoration, Including Two NorCal Projects

Thanks to the Fisheries Restoration Grant Program from the California Department of Fish and Game, California Trout has received $4,972,486 for six projects that will help improve and restore fisheries throughout the state. These projects are funded by voter-approved Proposition 68, which provides funding to CDFW to award grants to projects that improve a community’s ability to adapt to the unavoidable impacts of climate change, develop future recreational opportunities, enhance drought tolerance, landscape resilience, and water retention.

Although of majority of the funds will be going to major projects in Southern California, here are the two projects funded in Northern California:

Advancing Fish Passage in the Little Shasta Watershed

$292,405 award from CDFW Proposition 68 funding

Photo: CalTrout

This project will result in the complete elimination of a temporal migration barrier currently blocking access to up to seven kilometers of ideal cold-water spawning and over-summering habitat for juvenile coho salmon habitat in the Little Shasta River. The project will also result in habitat enhancement, improved ecological function, and improved streamflow at critical times of the year for out-migrating juvenile coho salmon.

Sulphur Creek Fish Passage Improvement Project – 100% Designs

$220,000 award from CDFW Proposition 68 funding

In this project, CalTrout partners with landowners and the Napa RCD to Protect and Restore anadromous fish habitat by readying a fish passage barrier on Sulphur Creek for removal, providing year-round access to spawning and rearing refugia off the main stem Napa River and improving ecosystem function. It furthers the goals of Prop 68 to improve and protect wildlife connectivity or habitat, coastal and rural economies, agricultural viability; and, improves a community’s ability to adapt to the unavoidable impacts of climate change.

Similarly, the project furthers the goals of Prop 1, by increasing the economic benefits arising from healthy watersheds: improving fishery resources and in-stream flow; implementing watershed adaptation projects to reduce the impacts of climate change on California’s communities and ecosystems; restoring aquatic ecosystems including fish and wildlife corridors; removing barriers to fish passage, and assisting in the recovery of endangered species.

Active NorCal

Northern California's Outdoor Digital Newsmagazine

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